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EMPLOY evidence-informed or evidence-based strategies at the right times

Prepare

REFER to your mental health disaster preparation plan and resources

Respond

CONSIDER the need to ‘step-up’ levels of care and refer individuals to the relevant mental health services as necessary

exercise

ENGAGE in self-care

What kinds of interventions will you provide as a disaster unfolds?

Health practitioners, health professional groups, governments and other organisations increasingly recognise that there are interventions that can be provided during and immediately after a disaster to help support the psychological wellbeing of individuals and communities – these are known as Level 1 interventions.

As health practitioners, we can enhance our ability to meet the mental health needs of disaster-impacted individuals in a timely fashion by using interventions such as Psychological First Aid (or PFA)- simple psychological strategies designed to address transient psychosocial difficulties.  PFA sits within a stepped-care approach to the provision of mental health services and is considered a Level 1 intervention, best implemented as a disaster unfolds and in its aftermath. PFA involves the timely provision of meaningful information and practical support to disaster-impacted individuals, and can be offered by a range of practitioners – training as a mental health professional is not necessary.

WATCH THIS VIDEO TO UNDERSTAND MORE ABOUT THE PRINCIPLES THAT UNDERPIN THE USE OF PSYCHOLOGICAL FIRST AID
VIDEO IS 6:12MINS IN LENGTH. CLICK HERE FOR TRANSCRIPT

Training + Resources

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Recovery Capitals (ReCap) Guide

The Guide to Disaster Recovery Capitals (ReCap Guide) is a resource for people, organisations and governments engaged in disaster recovery.
It aims to support wellbeing after disasters by providing evidence-based guidance to aid decision making, encouraging strengths-based, holistic and inclusive recovery approaches to recovery.

The guide identifies seven areas of recovery – natural, social, financial, cultural, political, built and human – and emphasises the interconnectedness between these ‘recovery capitals’.

View ReCap Guide