Are you a Victorian emergency services worker interested in helping improve the mental health support available to you and your colleagues? A new study is looking for participants.

This study aims to promote good mental health by better understanding which types of support would be of most interest to emergency services workers who are experiencing problems with sleep, anger or relationships.

In collaboration with:

 

What does the study involve?

Participation is anonymous, and involves taking part in a one-on-one interview conducted by a researcher from Phoenix Australia. Interviews will take between 30 and 45 minutes and can be done via videoconference or telephone.

 

You will be asked about what you think are the early signs that show a person may not be doing well, and what types of support (such as apps, online programs, or face-to-face) would be of most interest to police and emergency services personnel who are experiencing mental health and wellbeing issues, such as sleep, anger or relationship problems.

 

For more information about participating in the study, please download the Participant information sheet and consent form here: Participant information sheet and consent form.

 

Am I eligible for the study?

We are looking for current employees or volunteers of any Victorian emergency services organisation, including those who are:

 

  • In transition to retirement
  • Operational workers with 6-10 years’ service
  • Corporate staff

 

If you feel you meet the eligibility criteria of this study, and would like to begin your participation, please register your interest with Sarah Hewat at [email protected] OR 0437 850 360.

 

Why is this study important?

Research has shown that high risk occupations such as emergency services can be associated with higher rates of self-reported psychological distress and some mental health conditions than the general community. Emergency services personnel who are experiencing sub-clinical mental health and wellbeing issues (e.g., anger, sleep problems, relationship difficulties) can be at increased risk of developing mental disorders if they do not recognise their symptoms, seek help early and get the help they need.

 

Despite the clear need within the emergency services community to provide timely access to mental health services, and considerable investment in mental health programs and services, there is still unmet need and under-utilisation of the available services.

 

This study aims to promote good mental health by better understanding which types of support would be of most interest to emergency services workers who are experiencing mental health and wellbeing issues.

Who is conducting the study?

The study is being conducted by Phoenix Australia – Centre for Posttraumatic Mental Health in collaboration with Emergency Services Foundation.

 

This research project has been approved by the University of Melbourne Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) (Protocol Number: 2020-20383-13285-3).

 

For further information about the study, please email [email protected].